Tendon Injuries Page 2

Peroneus Brevis Split Tear with Surgical Repair and Removal of Torn Tendon Portion. (below)

Partial Tear Peroneus Brevis Tendon. (below)

Removal of Torn portion and debulking of tendon. (below)

Final Placement of Peroneal Tendons back in the fibular groove and suture replacement for repair of Superior Peroneal Retinaculum and Tendon Sheath. (below)

Below, Peroneal Tear with Low lying muscle belly. The muscle belly is removed and bulked to allow gliding and reduce congestion.

 

 

The muscle belly is seen at the right and closure of the sheath on the left and bottom pics.

Below, dislocated peroneal tendons are being repaired and reduced to the anatomic location.

The tendons are dislocated to the outside of the fibula instead of behind.

These are intraoperative pics of a woman who traumatically dislocated her peroneal tendons in a fall.

These are pics of the peroneus longus dislocated over the fibula. The instrument on the bottom is pointing towards the tendon. The instrument on the top left is showing where the tendon should be.

This is a pic of us relocating the tendons.

The following pic is of us debriding the side of the fibula to allow the ligament and tissue to connect to the fibula during healing so the tendons do not dislocate.

This is a pic of the suture passing through the fibula to attach the retinaculum and tissue so the peroneal tendons do not dislocate or sublux.

This is a final pic of the repair

Pics of repair of peroneal retinaculum for dislocating peroneal tendons

The sutures can be seen prior to repair

The retinaculum is repaired through drill holes in the fibula and the sutures are woven through the bone

Pic after complete repair

 

Bulbous thickening of peroneus brevis with split thickness tear

The bulbous portion is removed and the remainder of the tendon is repaired back onto itself.

Below, Split thickness tear before and after excision of a portion of the tear

Below, Flattening of Peroneus Brevis before and after repair

Below, Split tear of peroneus brevis before and after repair

Below, Bulbous thickening of the Peroneal tendon

Bulbous thickening of the tendon noted

The tear inside the bulbous thickening is resected and the tendon is repaired onto itself

This is a picture of the CFL being repaired with suture during peroneal tendon repair

Below, Intraop Pics of intrasubstance tear of Peroneus Longus with excision of low lying muscle belly, tear and repair

Below, Intraop Pics of intrasubstance tear of peroneus longus with repair

Below, Intraop pics of low lying muscle belly of peroneus brevis

Pic of CFL behind the peroneal tendons

Below, Pic of low lying muscle belly resection of the peroneus brevis which causes pain due to congestion.

Pics of repair of a traumatic laceration of the peroneus brevis

Pic of the suture of the adjacent side of tear prior to reapposition

Pic of apposition of tendon edges

Split Tear of Peroneus Brevis during repair

Split tear of Peroneus Brevis

Visualization of the tear

The portion diseased tendon removed

After the removal of tissue, the tendon sits nicely behind the groove and the area is debulked

Pic during debulking of peroneus brevis muscle and tendon

Split tear of P. Brevis

Pic after repair. The sutures can be seen in the tendon post repair

Intrasubstance tear of Peroneus brevis

Portion of diseased tendon excised

Pic Post repair

Split tear of peroneus brevis during repair

Portion of tendon excised

Pic after repair

Pics of split tear of peroneus brevis

Pics of split tears of peroneus brevis

Pic of intrasubstance tear and boomeranging of peroneus brevis tendon

Pics after debaulking of tendon and repair

Pic of Split tear of the Peroneus Brevis and section that was removed. This is caused by the Peroneus longus constantly pushing the Brevis into the back of the fibula. It can be due to repeated microtrauma or one isolated traumatic event, i.e. ankle sprain or fracture).

Pic of Split tear of the Peroneus Brevis and section that was removed. This is caused by the Peroneus longus constantly pushing the Brevis into the back of the fibula. There was also a low lying muscle belly of the Brevis that was removed with the damaged tendon. This can be seen at the left side of the removed tendon. The tear can be due to repeated microtrauma or one isolated traumatic event, i.e. ankle sprain or fracture).

Split Tear of the Peroneus Brevis

The torn damaged portion is removed and the tendon is repaired onto itself

Intrasubstance tear with bulbous thickening before and after repair

 

The torn damaged portion is removed and the tendon is repaired onto itself

Below, Peroneal Tendon Tear with low-lying muscle belly that is being removed in the 3rd pic. The tendon is then repaired and tubularized.

Intrasheath subluxation of Peroneal Tendons with Split tear of tendon

  

  

Revision of other surgeon's allograft application for prior Peroneal repair